Be consistent and small. That’s how you win at business.

Be consistent and small. That's how you win at business. You'll see what I mean and it's simple.

These are the words I will pass on to my daughter or son (if I have a child in the future) should they ask me about how to be successful, or start a meaningful business, or build a purposeful life.

I have actual tears in my eyes as I begin to write these words. Partially because I was humbled and unable to speak after reading your comments on yesterday’s post (thank you, forever), and partially because I am overwhelmed with the simple, powerful truth I’m about to share.

These words probably won’t be new to you. No words really can be. But it’s the decision to embrace and apply them that matters.

Raise your hand if you are like I am when it comes to ideas—you have 1.3 million of them . . . every single time you blink or inhale.

They crowd your mind, excite you, drive you, wake you up, prevent you from sleeping, and honestly . . . eventually overwhelm you.

Your ideas are great. And any one of them CAN work. Any one of them CAN be the thing that helps you create a lifestyle where you’re able to breathe, take breaks, provide for your family in new ways, actually go on a vacation, etc. ANY single one of your ideas can do that.

But they’re likely all missing the thing that all of my ideas were missing a few years ago before I started this brand.

Consistency and smallness.

“Mom, what can I do to be great? Even when all the odds are against me?” asks my fictional child. Let’s name him Emmanuel—obviously we can all refer to him as Manny. Or, “The Man.”

“Son,” I reply slowly. “Be consistent, and be small. Every single day.”


Be consistent.

Show up. Consistently.
Keep creating content.
Speak passionately to a crowd of 0.
Until you’re speaking passionately to a crowd of 3. That’s 3 whole people, with whole lifetimes of experience and memories, who have chosen to tune into your words. That’s an honor.

Create. Consistently.
When everyone else has gone to bed.
When everyone else has stopped paying attention to your dreams.
When absolutely no one seems to care.
When someone has recommended to you that you stop or that you move onto something more logical (to them—major eyeroll emoji).

Love. Consistently.
Until your love finds the community of people it’s most needed by.
Until people can’t help but take your concern for them seriously.
Until someone, somewhere believes in themselves again.

Listen. Consistently.
Not just until you hear the one thing you choose to respond to.
Not just until it gets uncomfortable.
Not only for the sake of appearances.
Not only to focus on how someone else’s words make you feel. But also to focus on how they feel.
But also to understand what people need from you.
But also to know what to create consistently, where to show up consistently, and how to love consistently.

Be small, son.

In the way you approach an important goal.
Because if you focus only on the grand dream . . .
And if you focus only on the one outcome you’re hoping for . . .
And if you care most about the final destination . . .
Then you miss the opportunity to take the steps to get there.
Then you miss the stops along the way that were meaningful and beautiful for you and for others.
Then you miss the signs that were pointing another direction—where more purpose and greatness were hiding.

My Top 8 Business Mistakes of 2016

My Top 8 Business Mistakes of 2016 and My Favorite Prescription for Work Stress

Oohey. This one is going to be a whole load of honesty, with a side of realness, and a smidgen of TMI for dessert. But hey. My goal is to present the behind-the-scenes truth, so that, if applicable, you can make decisions and take action based on a realistic picture. Not a world full of staged images (which I take sometimes too—so I’m not judging), embellished income reports, and all that jazz.

My Top 8 Business Mistakes of 2016

1. Not choosing the right path during the ultimate debacle and disaster that consisted of offering services and accidentally selling more spots than I intended.

All my close friends and family know of something we affectionately call #Project50. Which was a time when my sales software was supposed to limit registrants to under 20 people (for a custom content plan I was putting together for each person), but it didn’t shut down until I noticed the error and did it manually . . . when over 55 people had registered.

Cue panic music and nervous laughter.

You see. I really hate to disappoint people. There are some parts of me that want to be “so above” caring what other people think, but at the core of who I am, I just do. I don’t like hurting people’s feelings (which makes me the worst and most confusing girlfriend ever when I’m trying to break up with someone), and I don’t like the feeling of letting someone down.

So, instead of refunding the last 30 or 40 people and potentially disappointing them because they wouldn’t be able to take advantage of the crazy price I was selling the package at, I decided to just clear my schedule (which meant not creating as much content), let people know the delivery time would be a little longer (and also offer them a refund if they understandably didn’t want to wait), then get to work trying to finish each plan—but still give each one the attention it deserved.

It was a disaster. Some people got their plans on time, other people kept getting offers to either (1) get a refund and accept a free eBook as my apology, or (2) wait a little longer and accept a free eBook as my apology. It drug on and on. I kept hoping people would just ask for a refund. And in the end I had to “force” refund a few people because I just couldn’t finish each plan.

A case study on my first $1350 online course launch

A candid case study on my first ever paid online course launch that brought in $1300, with an email list of only 71 people.

So, you may not know this, but the first paid online course launch I ever did (about 2.5 years ago) was to an email list of only 71 people. For a total of $1350. And some recurring revenue of about $1000 per month after that. And guess what? I ran exactly zero high-pressure webinars (or webinars at all) for my launch, and I sent zero pesky emails, just emails filled with value and information.

It was a crazy time. In which I had no idea what I was doing, but I desperately wanted to get my valuable, organized information out to more people at once—more people than I was able to reach through 1-on-1 coaching and small in-person workshops.

“But, what’s up on this case study though?” You may be wondering.

It’s funny. I was having a conversation with one of my best friends not too long ago—a friend who was definitely around me all the time when I was launching this first product—and they had absolutely, 100%, no idea that my email list had only 71 people on it when I first released this course. And then, they told me it actually inspired them a ton.

That meant so much to me. And also made me realize that the few Periscope broadcasts I’ve shared this in before are not enough to really help and (hopefully) inspire others. I knew I had to make a case study out of it.

And so I did. I made two versions even. A shorter one that you can consume as a podcast and cheat sheet and a longer one that you will be able to watch as a workshop in the near future. For now, may I please introduce you to the audio version.

You can catch it as a podcast episode here (it’s even downloadable). And you can download the accompanying cheat sheet here. Or, you can read below for some of what I cover in a Q+A style. It’s not the whole episode and all the tips, but if you’re short on time or only want to read, the cheat sheet or summary below is for you.

$1350 course launch case study cheat sheet

Course Launch Case Study Podcast Episode

So, some of the main highlights of what I cover are in this episode are:

  • What it means to “scale” a product. (Hint: Scalability does not mean passive income.)
  • How I built my (super small) audience before my launch.
  • How I decided on the topic of my first course.
  • What exactly my first course consisted of.
  • How much (if any) money I had to spend to make the course.
  • How I picked the price for my first course.
  • How long the course took to make and if it was finished when I launched. (Hint: No. It wasn’t.)
  • How I promoted the course and which promotion efforts gave the best results.
  • How much (net) money the course brought in.
  • What % of my total list purchased.
  • What I did after my launch.
  • And more.

10 Epic WordPress Themes for Infopreneurs (Under $50 Each)

10 epic WordPress themes for infopreneurs--all for under $50.
As I’ve been creating some new secret brands and helping both clients and friends build more clarity and profitability into their businesses and websites, I’ve noticed something major. It’s HARD to find good WordPress themes for infopreneurs.

As someone creating valuable content and selling your knowledge as information products, it’s extremely important to have a website that is attractive, functional, and organized in a way that helps direct your audience to what you need. And if you’re like me, in love with WordPress and all its capabilities (not that I don’t frequently build Squarespace sites too), then you may be lost on what themes best suit your needs.

And I wouldn’t be a proper co-host of #InfopreneurMonth (P.S. it’s free; check it out and register here) without putting together a list of amazing themes that you can use for your information business.

Hey, did I mention that it’s #InfopreneurMonth?

Infopreneur Month is a set of free workshops, lessons, and resources all about creating content that you can monetize ethically.

Okay, now that we know all about the exciting content of this month, let me introduce you to my 10 favorite themes for infopreneurs . . . all available for under $50 from Creative Market . . . one of my favorite sites to get business goods from.


A great WordPress theme for infopreneurs

1. Wildfire

I love the intelligent design of Wildfire. It brings in the popular trend to highlight one main call to action (CTA) at the top of your site with a large hero image, but it also allows you to highlight other content and resources quite nicely on the home page (in the 3 boxes below the hero image).

As an infopreneur, you could use the top CTA to direct people to your newest, best free resource that serves as an opt-in for your email list. Perhaps it could be something like:


The 6 Most Profitable Blogger Career Paths (and How to Get Started in One)

The 6 Most Profitable Blogger Career Paths and Tips on Deciding How to Monetize Your Interests

Oh man. Listen. I 100% believe what I’m about to say and it IS big. I’m not even necessarily being the overly dramatic version of myself that I normally am.

Here it is.

There are six distinct blogger career paths, which if you understand and work on, can absolutely change your world.

I’ve been down each one of these paths in the past, and it is time to share them . . . and to change the careers that we consider, pursue, and build for ourselves.

P.S. Everything below and more is available as a podcast episode. And here is the flowchart I reference and show.

How do you make money as a blogger? What careers are there in blogging. Here's a resource to help.

For years, and years, and years society has been quick to teach us the traditional career paths of lawyers, and teachers, and plumbers, and even professional basketball players. We know which schools we need to go to, which judge to get an internship with, how to get certified during night school, which recruiters and game stats we should shoot for, etc.

We know that once we become a lawyer, we can look forward to either practicing law at a major firm and trying to make partner, or starting our own firm, or teaching law, or working as a public defender, or working for a major corporation as an attorney, or doing pro bono, or advising a non-profit, or getting into politics and perhaps running for president of our country one day.

Great.

But, what about career paths for bloggers? For content creators? For some of these positions and interests that are popping up, making money, and sticking around?

Just as becoming a lawyer doesn’t guarantee you money or clients, but it does provide many paths to monetize (explained above) and many specialties to focus on (family law, corporate issues, intellectual property, taxes, tort law, etc.) and is thus considered a legitimate career . . .

becoming a blogger doesn’t guarantee income or fame, but it does provide many paths (explained below and in the podcast episode) and practically endless specialties to focus on (food, business, travel, crafts, fitness, accounting, fashion, etc.) that make money and should thus be considered a legitimate career.

I hope they start teaching it in schools everywhere soon. But until then, may I please present my shiny new Blogger Career Paths flowchart with some explanations and notes (if you’re taking them) that I hope will blow your mind? Okay. Let’s get started.

The 6 Blogging Career Paths

The first thing to understand is what is happening in any career path, anywhere, at any time, on any day. You are learning something new in one of two ways. You are either:

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