Create a Feel-Good Facebook Ads Funnel for Your Course or eBook

Facebook Ads Funnels for Courses and eBooks

Long before I could even begin to define a Facebook ads funnel, from the moment my first $3 sale showed up in my eCommerce dashboard for an eBook I’d written out of pure necessity (to help potential clients plan their brand fully before I started working on their website), I was amazed at the magic/science of someone who doesn’t know you one day, purchasing from you and passionately sharing your stuff all over the web the next day.

I made up my mind to get a Ph.D. where I could research the factors that go into the purchasing decisions of consumers buying from infopreneurs, influencers, and “authorities” online. Still working on that whole Ph.D. thing, but until that time, I have some 80% nerdy, 20% hip, but 100% mind-blowing examples and trainings for you if you want to start selling your programs, services, or digital products online . . . on autopilot . . . while remaining very human and in touch with the people you are serving.

We’re gonna get into actual funnel examples, and so much more . . . you’re ready, right? Oh, and I told you about the free case studies and masterclasses to help you learn Facebook ads from scratch, right? More on that later. And more on these mysterious sheets in a second.

Facebook ads funnel examples for an online business owner

First, it’s time to briefly review what a funnel is and why I go through an intense period every 2 years or so where I desperately try to think of a different name for “funnels” because of the way people abuse, misuse, overuse, etc. the term.

What is a funnel, really?

A funnel is simply one or more of your ideal audience members being drawn in by an amazing resource or gift you offer, then being taken through a series of content pieces you’ve created, in which each piece is meant to: (1) educate and motivate your audience to act on something helpful to them, and (2) accomplish a specific brand goal for you.

The Parts of an Effective Facebook Ads Funnel

My belief is that even though your funnel may have one general goal, the most feel-good, customer-centric, and sensitive funnels are ones that are highly valuable even if someone doesn’t purchase anything and/or ones that have a few stop-off points for people just in case your end goal is not what they need.

Which is why I’m always trying to rename “funnel” . . . people in the online marketing space seem to love to abuse the word . . . by offering little value, lots of pressure, and only high price point resources. Funnels don’t have to be ridiculous. They can be some of the most amazing experiences for your audience . . . something that you get thank you emails and fire emoji tweets about.

Back to the point of this article . . .

Let’s get to an example funnel, eh?

We can take the example of my totally real friend (I didn’t make him up or anything) named Theo to illustrate extremely helpful funnels. In this content series, Theo is not only selling his $35 guide to being a digital nomad in Playa del Carmen, but he is also dishing out essential, valuable information for people who might only need a few additional details or for people who can’t yet afford his book.

Example Funnel from Theo

That funnel looks super sexy and helpful, right?

But you may have noticed a very key thing is missing. “Traffic” as the marketers say. Humans as I like to call them. How are human-actual-people going to become aware of Theo’s amazing free video on “A day in the life of a digital nomad in Playa del Carmen” to begin with?

Getting people to the start of your funnel . . .

There are countless ways someone can become aware of Theo’s video (or his free checklist, or his workshop, or whatever he chooses to share):

  • Theo might share a link to his video in a Facebook Group for digital nomads that he’s a part of
  • Theo might share his link on Instagram
  • Someone might tweet out about Theo’s video/resource
  • People could find his video from a pin on Pinterest or a Facebook Live video
  • . . . and so on

BUT. How can Theo create a consistent stream of the right kind of people landing on his resources? People who are interested in travel, digital nomading, living abroad, doing freelance work on the Internet, etc.?

One seriously epic way is to invest a little time learning how to target, and scale with, Facebook ads.

And I have some seriously cool examples for you in this article. But first, know this: I used to be so epically scared of Facebook ads. I was 100% sure (in my state of ignorance) that they were going to waste my time and money.

Think Twice About Your Online Course’s Refund Policy

Why self-serving refund policies make me cringe.

P.S. For you fellow Drake fans, I was considering titling this post, “If you’re reading this, it’s not too late” but then I realized you would have no idea what the article was about.

P.P.S. I am seriously open to debate on this topic. I will present my views but I am deeply interested in learning from the way other people see the world.

There is one reason (you—if you’re someone who is busy building a meaningful business) I was inspired to write this, and I have a few quick illustrations below to show my reasoning. Hopefully you won’t hate me when it’s over.


Why I’m strongly against online course and digital product refund policies that make people do X amount of work or jump through fiery hoops to get a refund.

You.

I write this blog for you. I create tools for you. I stay up at night dreaming, scheming, and creating for you. Not just in the “I say this because this is how online marketers are supposed to talk” way, but in the “No, literally, I relate to where you are and who you are, and where I had to come from to create various businesses and products I love” kinda way.

Refund policies that make clients submit worksheets, and modules, and proof of this and that and the other rub me the wrong way.

If your entire audience consists of people who don’t care about money at all, then cool.

If you have people in your audience that care about spending their money on things they get value out of, or who are on a specific budget, or who may, despite your wishes and requests, spend their last dollar on your program, then hmm.

23 Types of Audio, Video, and Other Media You Can Add to Your Course (or Blog) to Make It Even More Epic

23 types of audio, video, and multimedia to add to your online course or blog

Not that text lessons and articles aren’t super valuable, but in the interest of making your online courses (or blog in general) more accessible, delightful, and useful for different learning styles, it is a good idea to explore the many types of media you can create—easily—and most often without any investment at all other than your time.

Check out the 23 types of media below that you can add to your online course, website, blog, landing pages, and more to create a more valuable and user-friendly experience for your students and audience.

Video

1. Animated videos with voice narration or an epic lesson

A nice change from slides (or from only including video of yourself), animated videos can be a great, clear way to communicate short lessons, to advertise your course, or to help students learn how to use your course dashboard. And yes, if you are wondering, I show you how to make animated videos from scratch, with a $0 video budget in The Epic Business Lock-In™.
Animated, educational video made with biteable.com

2. Recorded presentations—video of your slide deck with narration/lesson audio

I use these a ton in my online courses. Even for lessons that you already have completely written out as text lessons . . . if it’s something that looks good as slides, and will offer a different learning experience for your students, why not record a quick presentation? You can use QuickTime for free, or get software such as Camtasia or Screenflow to do this.

Add videos of your slides or presentations to your course

3. Live online workshops

One way to build out the modules of your course, or add valuable bonus content to them, is to create live online workshops on your course topic. You can use them as your main course sections by releasing them on a schedule and making them only available to your students, or you can use them as standalone content pieces (either paid or free) to build your email list or to have additional surprise content to offer your students or blog readers.

Even as a super duper introvert, I’ve now done more live workshops than I can possibly count. They are a wonderful way to get used to teaching, test out content, grow your email list, or build your course. If you’re considering doing your first live workshop, check out The 7 Types of Online Workshops You Can Use to Grow Your Brand, or my article on How to Create + Host Online Workshops (or Live Classes) for Free.

4. Online workshops, edited and repackaged (with extra goodies) after the initial recording

This is one of my favorite ways to create NEW value and new content out of something you’ve already done. You can take one or all of the live workshops you created in #3 above and make them awesome by:

  • Editing the recording down and taking out unnecessary dialogue, time-specific references that don’t apply anymore (ex: “Next week I’ll be doing another workshop on X topic.”), and any sections you don’t feel went well.
  • Adding in a re-recording of any sections that you want to redo. You can also add in corrected slides (if you noticed an error after it was too late to fix it), or entirely new sections that you think of by simply recording your screen (talked about below) and audio at the same time.
  • Adding in a workbook to the workshop. Now that you’ve done the live event, you know exactly what you said, all the points you shared, and you have all the content done . . . why not make an actionable workbook or follow-along notesheets for your workshop? If you were rushing to get a workbook done before the event, you can now go back and make it everything you want to.
  • Creating a PDF export of your slide deck (if you have one) for people to download and use after the fact to follow along with your workshop.
  • Getting a transcription of your workshop, or transcribing it yourself, so that you have a text version of everything you said. This is something I’ve done by hiring someone form Upwork.com. Once you have a transcription, you can provide a more accessible version of your content to people.

5. Screencasts

Videos of your screen (often called screencasts) allow you to provide software tutorials, or tips/hacks on how to do any type of computer task, and much more. In the example below, I’m talking through a flow chart for a business. Screencasts are one of my favorite types of videos to create and teach because they don’t require much tech (plus they don’t require you to have your face on screen if that’s not really your style) and can be done for free.
Screencasts can be amazing ways to show software function, share slides, and so much more

A case study on my first $1350 online course launch

A candid case study on my first ever paid online course launch that brought in $1300, with an email list of only 71 people.

So, you may not know this, but the first paid online course launch I ever did (about 2.5 years ago) was to an email list of only 71 people. For a total of $1350. And some recurring revenue of about $1000 per month after that. And guess what? I ran exactly zero high-pressure webinars (or webinars at all) for my launch, and I sent zero pesky emails, just emails filled with value and information.

It was a crazy time. In which I had no idea what I was doing, but I desperately wanted to get my valuable, organized information out to more people at once—more people than I was able to reach through 1-on-1 coaching and small in-person workshops.

“But, what’s up on this case study though?” You may be wondering.

It’s funny. I was having a conversation with one of my best friends not too long ago—a friend who was definitely around me all the time when I was launching this first product—and they had absolutely, 100%, no idea that my email list had only 71 people on it when I first released this course. And then, they told me it actually inspired them a ton.

That meant so much to me. And also made me realize that the few Periscope broadcasts I’ve shared this in before are not enough to really help and (hopefully) inspire others. I knew I had to make a case study out of it.

And so I did. I made two versions even. A shorter one that you can consume as a podcast and cheat sheet and a longer one that you will be able to watch as a workshop in the near future. For now, may I please introduce you to the audio version.

You can catch it as a podcast episode here (it’s even downloadable). And you can download the accompanying cheat sheet here. Or, you can read below for some of what I cover in a Q+A style. It’s not the whole episode and all the tips, but if you’re short on time or only want to read, the cheat sheet or summary below is for you.

$1350 course launch case study cheat sheet

Course Launch Case Study Podcast Episode

So, some of the main highlights of what I cover are in this episode are:

  • What it means to “scale” a product. (Hint: Scalability does not mean passive income.)
  • How I built my (super small) audience before my launch.
  • How I decided on the topic of my first course.
  • What exactly my first course consisted of.
  • How much (if any) money I had to spend to make the course.
  • How I picked the price for my first course.
  • How long the course took to make and if it was finished when I launched. (Hint: No. It wasn’t.)
  • How I promoted the course and which promotion efforts gave the best results.
  • How much (net) money the course brought in.
  • What % of my total list purchased.
  • What I did after my launch.
  • And more.

The 6 Most Profitable Blogger Career Paths (and How to Get Started in One)

The 6 Most Profitable Blogger Career Paths and Tips on Deciding How to Monetize Your Interests

Oh man. Listen. I 100% believe what I’m about to say and it IS big. I’m not even necessarily being the overly dramatic version of myself that I normally am.

Here it is.

There are six distinct blogger career paths, which if you understand and work on, can absolutely change your world.

I’ve been down each one of these paths in the past, and it is time to share them . . . and to change the careers that we consider, pursue, and build for ourselves.

P.S. Everything below and more is available as a podcast episode. And here is the flowchart I reference and show.

How do you make money as a blogger? What careers are there in blogging. Here's a resource to help.

For years, and years, and years society has been quick to teach us the traditional career paths of lawyers, and teachers, and plumbers, and even professional basketball players. We know which schools we need to go to, which judge to get an internship with, how to get certified during night school, which recruiters and game stats we should shoot for, etc.

We know that once we become a lawyer, we can look forward to either practicing law at a major firm and trying to make partner, or starting our own firm, or teaching law, or working as a public defender, or working for a major corporation as an attorney, or doing pro bono, or advising a non-profit, or getting into politics and perhaps running for president of our country one day.

Great.

But, what about career paths for bloggers? For content creators? For some of these positions and interests that are popping up, making money, and sticking around?

Just as becoming a lawyer doesn’t guarantee you money or clients, but it does provide many paths to monetize (explained above) and many specialties to focus on (family law, corporate issues, intellectual property, taxes, tort law, etc.) and is thus considered a legitimate career . . .

becoming a blogger doesn’t guarantee income or fame, but it does provide many paths (explained below and in the podcast episode) and practically endless specialties to focus on (food, business, travel, crafts, fitness, accounting, fashion, etc.) that make money and should thus be considered a legitimate career.

I hope they start teaching it in schools everywhere soon. But until then, may I please present my shiny new Blogger Career Paths flowchart with some explanations and notes (if you’re taking them) that I hope will blow your mind? Okay. Let’s get started.

The 6 Blogging Career Paths

The first thing to understand is what is happening in any career path, anywhere, at any time, on any day. You are learning something new in one of two ways. You are either:

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