How to Expand a Blog Post (or Series) into a Book

If you’ve had a blog for more than a week, you likely have at least one blog post up. More than a month or so? You may even have a whole blog series up.

Which means . . . that in another month or so, you could theoretically create a helpful non-fiction book out of your blog post or blog series.

I’ve done this before (5 or more times), and many others have done this too, so if you decide this is the year to publish your book by expanding on something already on your blog, you won’t be alone.

When expanding on posts that already exist for free on the Interwebs, it’s a good idea to take a step back and take a fresh look at the whole topic from the reader/customer perspective.

This comes in the form of five questions you can ask yourself about your current post or series as well as five general idea-generating questions you can ask yourself to create an awesome chapter/content list for your book. You can download the worksheets below (just click on them) to help you work through and record your ideas from this post.

How to go from a blog post series to a book

For the purposes of this post, let’s take for example a series you did on car maintenance for your “modern superwoman” blog. P.S. If it is a single post you are turning into a book, break it down into the main points/sections you made. Below, I assume it is a series, but you can change my list out for your post sections.

20 Actions You Can Take to Look Like a Pro Blogger

When you put the word “pro” in front of an action or position in life (one that refers to a person), it typically means that the word or action is done as a profession–as in: it makes money or it is the person’s job.

Which definitely brings me to the time I met Allen Iverson. I was closing up shop at a retail establishment I used to manage in New York. A limousine pulled up right in front of our doors after I had already locked up. My mind said: I’m not unlocking the doors unless it’s Idris Elba. Or Justin Timberlake. Or Rosario Dawson. Or Judi Dench. Or anyone who has ever played James Bond in a film. But that’s it.

Who do you think that is?” one of the sales associates asked.

At this hour and at this store, probably a pro baller,” said another team member. [P.S. This was a shoe store we were in.]

Pro baller. Good guess. Where pro means the person doesn’t just play basketball for fun . . . someone, somewhere hands over a paycheck for them to play. And the paycheck is probably large. Hence the limousine. And the late arrival to my store. And the stock guy who came running out of the back begging me to open the doors as soon as he saw one half smidgen of Iverson’s head. Allen Iverson was his favorite basketball player ever.

I had already made my mind up that I wasn’t going to open the door except for the people noted above, but could I really deny a friend their chance to meet someone they thought was epically talented (regardless of how I felt about this person)?

I’m not that mean. I unlocked the door. Every single employee was geeking out. The stock guy offered to be his salesperson, a salesperson offered to be his cashier (but then asked me to ring him up instead because she was too nervous). I felt like I was the only person acting like a normal human being–which is so far from being an accurate thing to say about me.

33 Types of Blogger Collaborations (For Fun + For Profit)

Ready for 33 blogger/brand collabo ideas? Some of these are just for fun (and to build community and blog traffic) and some of these can be done for profit (dollar dollar bills y’all and brand awareness).

So, I want to talk (1) reasons to collaborate, (2) types of free collaborations, (3) collaboration ideas for profit, (4) pitch etiquette, and (5) pitch “musts” in the form of a checklist.


Reasons to Collaborate with Other Bloggers

Collaborating with other content creators is about so many things beyond simply growing your blog traffic. Here are just a few of the benefits:

  • Collaboration will expand your community and your opportunities to connect with people who want and need what you have to offer. Collaboration will also connect you with like-minded people; these connections can go anywhere (from friendships and people who share your stuff to long-term profitable relationships).
  • Collaboration allows you to be seen in a different light. I mean this in two ways: (1) The person or people you collaborate with will present you in a different way than you would. Whether in an interview, or an introduction, or a promotional tweet, the other person can say things about you that would look ridiculous, conceited, or just plain weird coming from you. (2) You can easily collaborate on something that is a hop outside your normal content—this allows you to pivot into new areas of expertise or simply add to what you already do.
  • Collaborations allow you to expand your offerings. You can begin to establish new areas of expertise for yourself . . . or collaborations can simply allow you to offer more products + content in your original area.
  • Collaborations will shed light on the feasibility and opportunity of new products and content. If people go cray cray for something, make it a product. If it fizzles out, modify it or move on.
  • Collaborations allow you to make more of an impact than you might be able to make alone. Two audiences instead of one. Two sources of ideas. Two people marketing something. Two voices adding value. You get the point.
  • Collaborations allow you to see things differently. You’re an absolute genius ninja, that is not to be doubted. However, sometimes it can be a beautiful thing to see the world, or a problem, or a product, or an idea through someone else’s viewpoint.
  • Collaborations provide a built-in sounding board and “checks and balances” system. Here’s the deal: We all have outlandish ideas at times. We all think of epic brand names, product features, and ways to word things that end up being not that great. Your collaboration partners mean that you will have constant reality checks. You’ll have another entity or two that’s a part of your target market to go, “Umm, I don’t think that’s going to go over as well as you might want. But good job though.”

Blog Income Report: The Tools That Helped Me Earn $16,000 Last Month

Let’s talk for a moment here. It was like this: I was having a cold and snowy Thanksgiving last year (#TruthBeTold I forget what we’re supposed to be celebrating on most holidays, so I typically just work and eat more food than normal on these days) when my Internet friend emailed me.

She’d read one of my Blog Income Reports and was debating whether she should start sharing hers. I encouraged her to do so because I really think they can be inspiring, and helpful, and such great learning tools, and . . . then she told me how much she’d made that month.

$25,000

Here was my immediate thought process, in the order my thoughts occurred. And don’t worry, the true inner dialogue is included below:

  1. This woman is a superstar.
  2. Daaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaang Gina, you’ll never make over $20,000 in a month. (Also, I sounded like Martin, from the show named Martin, when I said this in my head.)
  3. Okay, okay, maybe one day I can make that much. But it’s like seven years out. And hopefully by then I’ll have convinced people to call me by my favorite nickname: Regick. (I blame this one on my love for Chronicles of Riddick, and I blame my love for that on . . . daaaaang Gina . . . there’s just no excuse for that.)
  4. Wait, why does it have to take me seven years? Sidenote: Buy the domain name byRegick.com to see if people will start calling me by my nickname.
  5. Hmm, what if I can do it sooner than seven years? No, no, silly Regick, that’s only for other people, not you.
  6. But hmm, what if I CAN do it sooner? You’re sounding like a crazy person Regick, but I like it.
  7. Know what? I can do it sooner.

And something crazy happened. byRegick, or byRegina, whatever you want to call it, made over $22K in December 2014 (and note: the report below is about January 2015). Not because I’m the most genius blogger (I’m just not), not because I had 20 million people visit my site (would that break the Internet?) . . . no, I reached that income goal because honestly, for the first time ever I believed and knew it was possible for a normal person like me. Knowing that my Internet friend, who is normal like us, could reach that level, made me acknowledge the possibility of it in my own life.

Why am I saying all of this? Because I really, really want you to read this report below and know that your goals are possible. The mere act of believing, in essence, gives us permission to go for our goals. It’s important to reach for them, not only for yourself and your family, but because your achievements will give other people “permission” in their own lives.

On Facebook the other day, I asked you if you liked seeing income reports from bloggers, and so many wonderful people said “Heck yes.”

I asked this question because amazing bloggers like Pat Flynn of Smart Passive Income inspire me with their reports, which is why I started these back in April of 2014. People like Pat have always felt somewhat unreal to me, but they truly are totally normal, real-life people. So, here is the income report of another totally real-life person, who would take you salsa dancing, rock climbing, or tequila drinking if you were in Austin right now.


Oh, and, P.S. >> Since I live in Austin, Texas, I feel I should be honest with you. We like to embellish and dramatize when it comes to weather conditions. It was probably actually 75 degrees Fahrenheit on the cold + snowy Thanksgiving I referenced above (with .2 drops of rain). And no, I don’t know what that is in Celsius; sorry, we the people of America don’t have logical units of measurement.


SEO for Bloggers: The Non-Techie Guide

Regina here. Desperately hoping I can make “#SearchEngineSaturday” a real thing, because that’s what I want to talk about today . . . and it’s a Saturday. And honestly, what I really want to do is get at the most important facet of search engine optimization (SEO) for bloggers >> it’s all based on humans >> and spending our lives worrying about techie, crawly, spider-y, secret robots who arbitrarily rank our sites is probably a waste of time. Allow me to expand this point:

I hope someone who knows me just laughed in their head at that and said, “Of course you’re going to expand Regina. You always talk too much. I mean, share such lovely, long details with us.”

So yes, I am going to share the 10 things that over time will make the biggest difference for your blog’s SEO, but in order to do that, I think it is best to explain what major search engines like Google are doing and how it’s really about humans. P.S. I will not be using ANY techie words in this post. This is a post you could share with your grandmother, or your 8-year old, or your awkward Uncle Phil who wants to start making money with the Internets but doesn’t even understand what the Internets is . . . are . . . is/are . . . I don’t know which one to use there.

What are search engines really doing?

Search engines (such as Google, Bing, and Yahoo!) are providing a service to humans. They attempt to go out into Internet Land and discover all the pages available. These pages can be actual website pages (like an About, Bio, or Contact page) that give specific information or they can be your individual blog posts. Search engines like to have a record of all the pages possible so that when a human comes along and searches for a specific term, the search engine has a large amount of pages to pull from and show as results.